Colonial pipeline resumes operations after hurricane Nicholas made landfall

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Colonial pipeline resumes operations after hurricane Nicholas made landfall

Fri, 09/17/2021 - 08:06
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Logo of Colonial Pipeline Co. (copyright by  Colonial Pipeline Co.)
Logo of Colonial Pipeline Co. (copyright by Colonial Pipeline Co.)

US largest fuel pipeline network resumed operations on Tuesday, as the facility withstood hurricane Nicholas, said the company spokesperson on Wednesday, Sept. 15, 2021. According to Eric Abercrombie, the Colonial Pipeline Co. spokesperson, the company resumed the transmission of gasoline and diesel fuels from Texas to the US East Coast.

The operations of both lines had been disrupted by hurricane Nicholas winds which plunged nearly half a million businesses and homes in Texas into a widespread blackout. Hurricane Nicholas caused torrential rainfall across Texas and Louisiana, causing another round of disruption in US offshore gas and oil production.

According to the notice to shippers, the company said it had pre-emptively shut down its main distillate fuels and gasoline lines following blackout outs in the Houston area. However, by Wednesday, the company had fully resumed the regular shipment of fuels.

The largest North America conduit network, Colonial Pipeline, supplies about 2.5 million barrels of refined products per day to most of the busiest fuel markets in the East Coast and South East Coast. While the company shut down during Hurricane Ida, it resumed operations a few days after the Ida made landfall.
Nicholas struck shore as a category one hurricane moved through Houston Metropolitan in the evening of Monday and continued to bring torrential rains to the US Gulf Coast. The disruption on the major pipeline the atlantic seaboard relies on drove the gasoline-making margin higher by 3.2% higher by Tuesday Morning.

According to the Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement (BSEE), the offshore drilling regulator, over 39% of crude oil and natural gas at the Gulf of Mexico were shut down on Tuesday, following the hurricane passage through Louisiana.

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